Tag - Social good podcast

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Using Humor for a Change
2
Mom Bloggers for Social Good
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Bringing the Professional and Private Together
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Crowdsourcing the Meaning of Life
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Social Good Podcast 2.0
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Volunteerism as Online Bumper Stickers
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Year End Fundraising and Social Media
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Social Good Podcast: The Delicious Debacle

Using Humor for a Change

Late last year, Leanne Pittsford and Leah Neaderthal, the two co-founders of Start Somewhere, did start something, a fantastic Tumblr called, When You Work for a Nonprofit. The blog is the subject of this month’s Social Good Podcast.

It’s a series of GIFs with short captions. Here’s one of my favorites

 

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Of course, this image and all the other images are a lot more fun as the moving GIFs. But, as you can hear from Leah on the podcast, the site is more than just good fun, it has a serious point. Leah and Leanne created a conversation starter about how hard it is for mid and junior level staff to get their jobs done in perpetually under resourced organizations with boards and volunteers who don’t always understand the work well. It’s an important conversation and one that we need to have more as a community. And thanks to Leah and Leanne, we are having it.

 

PS: I also appreciate this shout out on their blog:

Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 1.40.25 PM

 

 

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Mom Bloggers for Social Good

P1030850Jennifer James was a young mom in Richmond, VA who took to blogging to connect with other moms, learn and share. Like millions of other parents have done over the past ten years. But, then, Jennifer noticed that a lot of the issues her fellow moms were talking about were causes like hunger and poverty. So, Jennifer, decided to take that part of her mom conversation and create a new umbrella for it, Mom Bloggers for Social Good.

I spoke to Jennifer for this month’s Social Good podcast. In less than a year, over 1,000 mom bloggers from around the world joined Jennifer’s coalition. In the podcast, she discusses how she set loose topics: health, education and poverty and then let her moms go to talk, link, and organize. She has formed partnerships with organizations including the Gates Foundation, Save the Children and Unicef. The partnership between the sponsoring organizations and the bloggers is a two-way street; the mom bloggers carry the messages of a particular campaign forward to their readers, and the organizations hear from the mom bloggers about any concerns or suggestions they have. Jennifer has created  an ongoing, global conversation about causes.

For instance, when Save the Children unveiled it’s State of the World’s Mother’s report this spring, Mom Bloggers for Social Good highlighted the report and asked their member to share their own birthing stories here – and on their other blogs (a note to remember, everyone has multiple channels to share stories.)

Here is Seaman Mom’s story on her blog.

I hope you’ll have a chance to listen to Jennifer on the podcast. I really admire what she’s doing and how she’s creating a loose network of engaged women sharing stories and advocacy for public policies around the world.

 

 

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Bringing the Professional and Private Together

Screen Shot 2013-03-07 at 10.42.01 AMThe question I am most asked by groups of professionals born before the Internet was popularized is, “How do I separate my professional and personal lives online?” In other words, where’s the dividing line and how high can I put up the wall? I asked Debra Askanase, the brains behind Community 2.0 to talk about this issue with me on this month’s Social Good podcast.

What I love most about Debra’s thoughtful take on this topic is that rather than think about separating our lives, she discusses how to bring your life together. It is unnatural and going to be unsustainable, she says, to try to juggle different identities online, and the combination of the two enhances both your professional and personal lives. Of course, it’s uncomfortable for folks who feel exposed talking about their personal life with their professional contacts online. However, if they don’t get a little personal, sound like a real human being, there is almost no point in being on the social web professionally. No one is going to engage in a conversation with a cardboard cut-out version of yourself.

For organizations that are terrified of employees speaking like real, human beings, Debra advices them to focus on policy not policing. There need to be parameters of what’s expected, and corresponding training and reflection time, but it is also critically important for organizations to trust their most important ambassadors, their staff, to talk on their channels.

For me, it always comes back to the cocktail party metaphor. Being online is like going to a cocktail party. Invariably, someone asks you about work, and you talk about it (unless you work at the CIA or some such.) And you talk about your kids and your vacation – not too much, you don’t want to bore anyone. And you ask about their work and kids and vacation. And that’s the same mix of personal and professional that happens online. It is up to the talker to figure out how much of what to talk about, and it may take some practice, but the people I know who were really hesitant to let their hair down online, and have summoned the courage to do it a bit, invariably enjoy the time they spend online more and are better able to connect with other people.

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Crowdsourcing the Meaning of Life

What is the Meaning of Life? Marc Erlbaum, a filmmaker, was pondering this question and decided the best way to wrestle with it was to engage a crowd. Marc’s experience raising $150,000 for the first phase of the project on the crowdsourced fundraising platform, Indiegogo, and his efforts to begin to crowdsource individual stories about the Meaning of Life, are the subject of my Social Good podcast this month.

Marc talked about how important it was that he began with an existing and engaged network on Facebook. Marc and his colleagues at Nationlight have spent several years nurturing and growing a crowd of supporters for their mission of changing the world through film. They have over 55,000 Likes on their Facebook page, and lovely posts that stimulate interesting conversations like this one:

It was a perfect springboard for launching the crowdsourcing effort.

Marc also discussed how much elbow grease it took to keep his fundraising campaign going (a lot!) and how important it is to keep stirring the pot and feeding the network with interesting content to keep them engaged, passing information on to their own networks and helping raise money for the effort.

And now, Marc is interested in gathering content for his film. Feel free to send him your story via email on his website or on the Facebook page. Marc and his team will be filming ten stories beginning in November.

 

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Social Good Podcast 2.0

I’m about to celebrate my third anniversary of hosting the Social Good podcast at the Chronicle of Philanthropy. It is such a privilege and great fun to have conversations with interesting people ever month – and to have so many people listen!

However, as I’ve written recently, it’s time for nonprofits to switch gears regarding the use of social media. Using social media are not longer optional or marginal to nonprofit success, they are integral. In other words, “Within these organizations social-media tools aren’t a department, a function, or one staff member’s job. The tools are integrated into every department and every function of the organization.”

The Social Good podcast needs to keep up with this transition.

Peter Panepento, my smart, colleague at the Chronicle, and I began to discuss the next iteration of the podcast. I also reached out to the wonderful Britt Bravo for advice because she’s well, Britt, smart, funny and has her finger on the pulse of all things social change.

Here’s our thinking to date for a new format for the podcast beginning in January 2012.

We’d like to get the voice of nonprofit staff and board members who have real questions and challenges into the podcast. We’ll begin by asking people to tweet in their questions/problems in trying to keep their organizations relevant and effective in the fast changing nonprofit landscape. Should we recruit Millennials for our board? What do we do with our aging direct mail donor base? How do we create social media policies? The podcast will be a conversation I’ll facilitate between the questioner (who may want to remain anonymous) with an expert providing context, resources and a few simple, immediate next steps.

And now it’s your turn! What do you think of this direction? Should the scope be narrower and more specific? Should folks be able to email in questions (I think tweeting imposes a discipline of being concise, but I could be wrong!) Should there be a crowdsourcing element to the problem solving?

I’d love to hear your suggestions!

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Volunteerism as Online Bumper Stickers

A few weeks ago, Robert Rosenthal, the Director of Communications for VolunteerMatch, an organization that matches volunteers with nonprofit organizations online, reached out to me to share that LinkedIn had added ways for people to identify their volunteer activities in their profiles. Here is the post he directed me to about the new fields for self-identifying one’s volunteer activities. And here is a screen shot for the page on LinkedIn for listing volunteer experience:

Robert joined me for this month’s Social Good podcast to discuss ways traditional volunteering, as opposed to the self-organizing we often focus on, is being enhanced by social media.

I love the points Robert made on the podcast about the two-way-ness of social media and volunteerism. It enables volunteers to wear their causes on their virtual sleeves, hence the volunteerism as online bumper stickers. And organizations can find new volunteers based on their passions. The challenge, of course, is how organizations can balance their need to engage volunteers to help with a specific event or task, while also encouraging them to take advantage of the entire social media toolkit to express themselves and self-organize.

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Year End Fundraising and Social Media

This month’s Social Good podcast focuses on the effect of social media on year-end fundraising in 2010.

My guests are Katya Andresen, the COO of Network for Good and Lena Shaw, social media marketing manager at the University of California at San Francisco.

Katya filled us in on the Online Giving Study conducted by Network for Good that, “More than 20% of all giving for the entire year occurs in the last 48 hours of the calendar year.” As Katya says on the podcast, almost a third of all giving happens in December. Katya has a terrific phrase for the late givers, she calls them, “Generous Procastinators.”

These statistics provide vivid reasons why online giving is so important; it is efficient and immediate and enables people to give when they want to the causes they admire.

Lena told an amazing story of the University’s partnership with Causes on Facebook had a year end campaign to raise money for a new children’s hospital. The campaign was called the “Challenge for Children” campaign. This is one of the most astonishing campaigns I’ve heard of using Causes; they were aiming to raise $100,000 and 1,000 new friends and raised over $1 million and over 165,000 friends! They created teams that were competing to raise the largest number of friends on Causes, not the largest donations, and you can see the result – they did both! You have to listen to Lena tell the story.

The challenge for Lena’s and others using social media for fundraising is how to engage these new friends and donors beyond the initial campaign. Stay tuned, that’s the rest of the story.

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Social Good Podcast: The Delicious Debacle

In mid December an ex-employee of Yahoo!, the owner of Delicious, released a slide from an internal presentation that indicated that Yahoo might close Delicious. Here is a copy of that slide showing which sites Yahoo! might shut down.

He tweeted the news that Delicious was shutting down and a picture of this slide, which immediately and naturally went flying around the web. Here is a post from TechCrunch about this event. This prompted thousands of people to look for a way to export their bookmarks from Delicious and import them to another, similar service. I saw this post from Michele Martin, a great blogger about nonprofits and social media that prompted me to think a bit more about what it means when a trusted tool shuts down, or even potentially shuts down. Strangely, and perhaps disastrously if Delicious doesn’t survive the defection of so many users, it took days for Yahoo to respnod to the rumors. Here is a post about their response.

Most of the social media tools that we use, like Facebook and Twitter, are free for the users. We invest a lot of time putting our data into these tools. What would happen if they one day disappeared?  Delicious is a very early social media tool that is widely used to bookmark websites and share those bookmarks with others. In this way a community or network of people can share what they’ve bookmarked and find useful websites quickly and easily.  I invited Allyson Kapin, the founder of Women Who Tech and co-founder of the web agency, Rad Campaign, and Michele to discuss the lessons from the Delicious meltdown with me for this month’s Social Good podcast.

I liked hearing about how Michele immediately went to her crowd on Facebook, blogs and Twitter to find an alternative to Delicious. Allyson was also very insightful about making sure we don’t put all of our network eggs in one basket and spread out among the social media channels to protect ourselves from a tool shut down. Allyson also talked about the importance of open source tools that we can preserved and supported by a community and not leave us at the whim of a for profit company.  I hope some foundations are listening to that last bit!

Hope you enjoy the podcast.

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