Tag - Ice bucket challenge

1
Action Cascades Over Viral Videos
2
ALS’ Happy Problem

Action Cascades Over Viral Videos

Screen Shot 2014-12-17 at 12.15.52 PMInvisible Children announced yesterday that it is closing its doors. You may not know the organization, but you almost certainly know their signature effort, the Kony 2012 video.

The video is very long, 30  minutes, on an obscure topic and was an instant viral sensation. It now has over 100 million views on YouTube. The video was an amazing piece of storytelling, alas, it was filled with half-truths. Moreover, the organization however was a mess roiled by mercurial and incompetent management.

All organizations should be managed better than Invisible Children or risk rightly going out of business. But there is another lesson here worth considering.

In Matterness, I discuss the need for organizations to shift their thinking from viral videos to action cascades. A viral video is a stand alone event. It certainly feels good to have lots of people watching what you have produced and sharing it with others. But there needs to be something to do baked into it. Max Siderov took the viral video of Karen Klein being bullied on a school bus outside of Rochester and turned it into an action cascade by raising money for Karen on Indiegogo. [Note: I put the link to the video of Karen being bullied here for context, but I don’t recommend watching it, it is cruel and shouldn’t be honored with a viewing.]

Organizations are too often rushing to create content that they hope will go viral without enough thought of giving people quick, easy and meaningful things to do to support an effort.There is no  way to guarantee that something will go viral, but there are ways to ensure that people could take constructive action as a result of watching it. The best actions to encourage are very specific ones. Not just share the video, but send it to three friends and ask them to do the same.

The Ice Bucket Challenge was an action cascade. The effort spread so widely not because of the videos, but because of the personal challenge to other specific people to do the same or donate within 24 hours.

My advice to people creating stories is to make sure the story is emotional and well-told, but also make sure it is connected to bite-size actions to turn it into a cascade of doing.

Share

ALS’ Happy Problem

Screen Shot 2014-10-06 at 1.51.20 PMWhat would you do with an extra $100 million? That’s the happy problem facing the ALS Association after this summer’s mega-viral ice bucket challenge. According to the ALS, the Challenge raised over $100 million from over 3 million people. Compared to $2.3 million last summer.

One of the first thing the organization did was let it’s command and control default setting get the best of it by trying to trademark the Challenge. As I’ve written before, the Challenge was powered friend to friend until the media picked it up. It is unlikely to be replicated at this scale again, nor should it be “owned” by an organization. ALS was the lucky recipient of a lucky and very generous event.

Back to the original question. The organization recently announced a three-fold increase in funding research from $7 million to $21 million. Eighty-five million to go.

Rather than doing more of the same, ALS has an opportunity to experiment with a different way of working. Unlike almost every other organization churning as fast they can for the next donation, the organization can take a deep breath and a step back and think about how to engage all of those new donors. Most of their 3 million new people are one-time donors, having participated in the Challenge because it was fun and social. But a small percentage of them can become regular supporters.

Here are a three ways ALS could begin to infuse their efforts with Matterness, the willingness of the organization to work different and demonstrate that everyone in their network can be important and heard, that will help it sustain it’s momentum over time.

1. Get Conversational. ALS has a nice presence on Facebook with nearly 340,000 Likes, presumably most of them new friends. The organization, though, continues to use the site as a billboard. The first thing to do with all of these new friends is to prove to them that they are part of the crafting of the organization’s new agenda, made possible by their donations. This is going to be very difficult for an organization that largely funds scientific research. They can put the parameters out there that a certain amount of their budget needs to be dedicated to research selected through, say, peer review panels. But there is still a significant amount of money to play with. How about dedicated 10% of whatever the organization has as discretionary funds now to whatever the community chooses to do with it. Start the conversation and see where it goes from there.

2. Find Some Little Bites. Not the snack food, the opportunity for all of ALS’ new friends to do something to help. Since the organization has the luxury, right now, of not asking for money, quite a difference again for the traditional nonprofit experience, it can instead find some interesting ways for people to help. Maybe there is some research on facilities treating people with ALS these new folks could help catalog. Or perhaps there are some new medical data sets being created through Obama care that the network could help crunch. Or collect information about ways that governments overseas are helping ALS patients. Anything that required too much manpower before is now on the table for the new ALS network to tackle. But, please, please, please, ALS, don’t do this work by hiring professionals to do it alone, inside the organization. You have a huge network of people who want to help, find some ways to put them to work.

3. Tell Stories. Make the funding of ALS personal. Invite people with ALS and their families to tell their stories of ways that the increased funding could help them. Just as the donors need to be properly thanked, the people battling the disease need to be recognized and given a voice.

 

Share

Copyright © 2013. Created by Meks. Powered by WordPress.