Archive - December 2014

1
Action Cascades Over Viral Videos
2
Fearless Leadership in a Social World
3
Verizon and Anti-Matterness
4
Why Giving Matters More Than Receiving

Action Cascades Over Viral Videos

Screen Shot 2014-12-17 at 12.15.52 PMInvisible Children announced yesterday that it is closing its doors. You may not know the organization, but you almost certainly know their signature effort, the Kony 2012 video.

The video is very long, 30  minutes, on an obscure topic and was an instant viral sensation. It now has over 100 million views on YouTube. The video was an amazing piece of storytelling, alas, it was filled with half-truths. Moreover, the organization however was a mess roiled by mercurial and incompetent management.

All organizations should be managed better than Invisible Children or risk rightly going out of business. But there is another lesson here worth considering.

In Matterness, I discuss the need for organizations to shift their thinking from viral videos to action cascades. A viral video is a stand alone event. It certainly feels good to have lots of people watching what you have produced and sharing it with others. But there needs to be something to do baked into it. Max Siderov took the viral video of Karen Klein being bullied on a school bus outside of Rochester and turned it into an action cascade by raising money for Karen on Indiegogo. [Note: I put the link to the video of Karen being bullied here for context, but I don’t recommend watching it, it is cruel and shouldn’t be honored with a viewing.]

Organizations are too often rushing to create content that they hope will go viral without enough thought of giving people quick, easy and meaningful things to do to support an effort.There is no  way to guarantee that something will go viral, but there are ways to ensure that people could take constructive action as a result of watching it. The best actions to encourage are very specific ones. Not just share the video, but send it to three friends and ask them to do the same.

The Ice Bucket Challenge was an action cascade. The effort spread so widely not because of the videos, but because of the personal challenge to other specific people to do the same or donate within 24 hours.

My advice to people creating stories is to make sure the story is emotional and well-told, but also make sure it is connected to bite-size actions to turn it into a cascade of doing.

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Fearless Leadership in a Social World

An article for the Stanford Social Innovation Review I wrote about the pivot that organizational leaders need to make to focus on Matterness.  “We need a different kind of leadership to enable organizations—whether traditional legacy organizations, start-ups, or all-volunteer networks—to focus on Matterness. Organizations that enhance Matterness are open to the input of constituents, and encourage leaders to be real human beings with flaws and vulnerabilities. They value Matterness relationships over transactions, and focus on facilitating crowds of people with their own good ideas and resources, rather than trying to own them. These organizations follow as often as they lead, listen more than they speak, and co-create with their crowds rather than dictate to them.”

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Verizon and Anti-Matterness

Screen Shot 2014-12-10 at 12.27.04 PMAs you all know, I am currently immersed in Matterness, the space where organizations make their people matter more. Where they listen more than they speak, engage as real human beings and work with not at people. The only problem with this mindset is that it makes the inevitable instances of anti-Matterness are even more startling and stark. In addition, the usual suspects like a doctor’s office or a telecom are almost too easy to criticize because, well, you know why.

Nonetheless, I need to tell you about how much anti-Matterness is baked into Verizon.

We had a service call scheduled for last Tuesday. They sent an email saying the service person would be here between 8 am – 8 pm. Hmmm, seems like a pretty big window. So, I called and was told they couldn’t make the window any smaller. So, I did what I do and took to Twitter. And there I got an immediate response, the service technician would be here between 3-5 pm. Here was the rest of our conversation via Twitter:

  • Why wouldn’t the telephone people tell me this?
  • Because they don’t have the data.
  • Why do you have the data?
  • Because our group focuses on escalated complaints.
  • This wouldn’t be escalated if the telephone people told me this.
  • That’s our policy.

Of course, the anti-Matterness here is egregious, but there is also something else interesting going on. Verizon considers Twitter the place where customers go to yell at them. Now, they get yelled on the telephone, too, but Twitter yelling is public for the world to see. Therefore, the job of the Twitter group is to quiet complaints very quickly. Instead of the whole system being engaged in making customers matter, the system is organized to give out as little information as possible and to mollify customers who start to squeak. This really is a Bizarro-world way of working with customers.

If anyone has any insights as to why Verizon works this way, I’d love to hear it.

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Why Giving Matters More Than Receiving

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 9.06.51 PMOn the heels of the wildly successful #GivingTuesday (first estimates put money raised at nearly $46 million just online, more than double last year’s total!) the idea of giving is in the air.

My friend Lisa Colton told me an interesting story today. She was facilitating a board retreat recently and asked the participants to pair up and talk about when they felt that they really mattered. The room was abuzz, she said, as the participants shared their stories with one another. When they reconvened she asked, “How many people heard stories about feeling like you matter when you receive something?” One person raised their hand. Then she asked the opposite question, “How many people heard a story about feeling like you mattered when you gave something?”  Forty-four hands went up. 44!

Of course, the old axiom, “It’s better to give than receive,” immediately comes to mind. But in an organizational context there is more to it than that. People want to be of service to organizations that they care about. However, as organizations became more professionalized over the last century, it seemed to be easier, faster, more efficient, less painstaking, for staff people to do more and more, for organizations to hire people to do jobs that volunteers used to do. Just because volunteers may not be available on Tuesday mornings anymore doesn’t mean that people don’t want to participate in meaningful and creative ways to help organizations. Instead, too many organizations have substituted fundraising for engagement.

Social media provide great opportunities for people to matter by contributing in lots of ways. People can help raise awareness of an issue, problem solve, gather people for discussions, do online research. The opportunities are almost endless for the ways that people can matter more to organizations. The challenge is for organizations, and their leaders, to see this as amazing opportunities to involve many more people in many more interesting ways! #GivingTuesday is a beginning, now we need a year round effort by organizations to make everyone matter more.

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